The importance of a well-written Email

The importance of a well-written Email

An email has always been a core tool for business communication. It is one of the most common triggers of unsubstantial pressure. An average official receives around 80-100 emails each day. The emails sent are always overlooked. There are a couple of rules to get your email witnessed and acted upon:

  • Avoid Overcommunication
  • Be Mannerly
  • Match your tone
  • Give required priority to subject lines
  • Keep your message brief and clear
  • Make good use of the vocabulary
  • Proofread

Make the best use of the subject line. For example, if you have observed the newsletters, they have two main objectives – The first one is to grab your attention and the second one is to briefly summarize the article based on which the reader decides to read it or not. An email with a blank subject line is most likely to be called spam. Avoid sharing sensitive information in an email. People are most likely to forward the emails or print them out without deleting the previous conversation. Choose the best vocabulary to tell the recipient what the mail is all about.

The emails you send are a reflection of your values. When we talk to someone in person, we use gestures, vocal tone, and facial expressions, but when we’re drafting an email, this information is robbed. This is why we need to have a good choice of words so that the message we want to convey is not misinterpreted. Try to maintain a certain level of formality and conclude your emails with “regards.”

Always take a moment to proofread the emails you’ve drafted and self-review them. They are an important part of your professional image, just like the clothes you wear. Pay attention to the length of your email. Crosscheck punctuations and grammatical errors. People are most likely to prefer concise emails. Make sure you exclude unnecessary information.

Most of us spend a part of our day reading and composing emails. Make your emails brief and straight to the point. Send them to people who need to read and acknowledge them, and be evident about what you would like the recipient to do. Your emails are supposed to create a reflection of your professionalism, significance, and engagement. Be polite and visualize how others might analyze the tone of your message. Always proofread what you have written before you “send.”

 

Posts You Might Like

Liberation & Freedom | Sylvia Winter

It’s always risky to pigeonhole extremely creative people—they’ve got more than one trick up their sleeve. In the case of Founder and Creative Director Sylvia Winter, those tricks also happen to include pilot, a podcaster with thousands of listeners, landscape designer, artist, runner, skier, mother, and more.

Transforming Central Texas with Care | Phyllis Snodgrass

Phyllis Snodgrass strongly believes in leading by example and showing people love and support. According to the CEO of Austin Habitat, everyone in the organization has a unique and special role to play. Still, it is easy for people who are not client-facing to lose sight of how their work fits into the bigger picture.

Leading with Courage & Determination | Natasha Bond

Natasha Bond does not believe in being afraid. She has been hailed as a fearless leader because she holds her ground in a technical, male-dominated STEM field. Her mantra is simple, “Don’t be afraid people won’t respect you for being female; assume they will treat you like a capable, confident part of the team and behave accordingly.

A Visionary & Fearless Leader | Lauren Eagan

Lauren Eagan, CEO of Eagan Immigration, is a visionary leader, and fearlessness has been a massive element in the work she does with her team. What separates her from a run-of-the-mill CEO is her compassion for her clients’ experiences, as well as a commitment to her team’s mental and emotional health.

Summary
The importance of a well-written Email
Article Name
The importance of a well-written Email
Description
An email has always been a core tool for business communication. It is one of the most common triggers of unsubstantial pressure.
Author
Publisher Name
The Women Leaders
Publisher Logo